Ringstrasse150 Project Launch

Ringstrasse150 Project Launch

Ringstrasse150 homepage screenshot.

Ringstrasse150 homepage screenshot.

We’re excited to be launching the Ringstrasse150 – Ring Ride project. The project consists of a website with information on improving walking and cycling in Vienna and a mobile phone game designed to increase engagement by linking to the website in the game results screen. The website is available here:

Ringstrasse150

We’ll be working on the website in the next few days to finish the German version and improve the content.

The Ring Ride game is available for Android from the Play Store:

Ring Ride Game for Android

The iOS version will be available as soon as it it approved by Apple.

We have rethought the project since our original idea for a website that would include mapping of improvement ideas. Instead the website now focuses on being a “one stop shop” for presenting information about how to improve walking and cycling in a city – in our case Vienna’s Ringstrasse. We’ll add learning elements to the website later. The main reason we decided not to include improvement mapping is that many cities already have these websites (including Vienna), so we’ll focus on trying to get people to use these existing websites.

If this project is successful similar websites could be developed for other cities following the same model. Here’s more information about the project and what we hope to achieve.

The goal is to increase support for walking and cycling improvements by creating a game (Ring Ride) that will introduce new people to organisations, activities, ideas and resources for walking and cycling in their cities.

Contact us if you want more information.

Public Transport Strategic Planning using Levels

Public Transport Strategic Planning using Levels

Zürich Stadelhofen Station Trams, 2010.

Zürich Stadelhofen Station Trams, 2010.

I’m making a presentation at SPUR in San Francisco on January 7 on the concept of public transport network level and using it to describe the performance and future improvement of Zurich’s public transport system.

A public transport level is a specific type of service designed to serve a particular market. Service is defined as a combination of vehicles, infrastructure and operating characteristics. A “pure” level is when the service is targeted specifically to one particular market. A “hybrid” level is when a service is targeted to serve several markets. Urban travel is generally described as three markets: short, intermediate and long distance trips.

Campaign poster for Zürich S-Bahn project in 1981. Project approved.

Campaign poster for Zürich S-Bahn project in 1981. Project approved.

Consequently many cities have developed three-level public transport networks: surface buses and trams to serve short trips, rapid rail to serve intermediate trips, and regional rail to serve longer distance trips. Often, by design or for historic reasons, cities have additional levels, fewer levels and/or the levels that are not precisely matched to their markets. For example, two-level networks are often found in medium size cities. Their advantage is lower costs while their main disadvantage is a mismatch between transport mode and market that manifests itself in capacity limitations.

Using the level concept to help analyze and plan public transport service is useful because it focuses attention on matching service qualities to markets. The presentation will use this approach to analyze the success of Zurich’s public transport system and to provide a structure for planning improvements that will be needed to meet rapidly increasing public transport demand. This approach could help other cities (re)design their public transport systems to be more attractive and efficient. More specifically, the approach could show how two-level public transport networks could be a viable option for medium sized cities and large cities with dispersed settlement patterns.

My co-authors Hermann Orth and Ulrich Weidmann are also presenting the paper at the Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting: A Level-based Approach to Public Transport Network Planning; Session 514: Public Transportation Planning and Development: Food for Thought on Networks Design, Accessibility, and Investment Policy Tuesday, January 13, 2015 8:00AM – 9:45AM Convention Center, 149.

Here’s a link to the full paper: A Level-based Approach to Public Transport Network Planning (forthcoming)

GreenCityStreets.com now online!

GreenCityStreets.com now online!


The new GreenCityStreets.com website is now online and it’s much improved. I’ve made “GreenCityStreets.com” the umbrella name for all my work in the field of using information technology applications to improve public participation. Consequently I’ve described the work that was done as part of the BusMeister project in 2011 and 2012 as the BusMeister project.

The new website will present an analysis of the latest ideas in using information technology applications to improve public participation. It describes the following activities:

The website includes pages on each of these subjects (click the link) as well as blog postings with new ideas.

The website also includes links to our games (BusMeister, Grr-Grr-Bike, Working on the Railroad) and projects.

The website is still a work in progress so check back again in the future and let me know if you have suggestions or ideas. In the meantime, we hope you like the new site!

GreenCityStreets – New Website

GreenCityStreets – New Website

GreenCityStreets-logo

I’m developing a new GreenCityStreets.com website to consolidate everything in one place. Here are some links to the in-progress work:

BusMeisterLogo

GreenCityStreets.com – Home

BusMeister – Project Results – The BusMeister project combined educational resources, a game and a crowdsourcing platform for helping improve the quality of participation in identification and support of public transport improvements.

BusMeister Public Transport Game – Information on the BusMeister game including a link to game

Grr-Grr-Bike – CycleMeister – About the game + download

Janes Walk Vienna Grinzing

Janes Walk Vienna Grinzing

Vienna and Vineyards from Krapfenwaldgasse Wien 1019

Vienna and Vineyards from Krapfenwaldgasse – Grinzing

I’m leading a walking tour from Cobenzl to Grinzing on May 2, 2014, as part of the worldwide Jane’s Walk weekend. Jane Jacobs (1916-2006) was an urbanist and activist whose writings championed a fresh, community-based approach to city building. Her book The Death and Life of Great American Cities is required reading for anyone interested in city planning and how cities work.

Sign showing proclamation by Kaiser Joseph II allowing grape farmers to sell their own wine (1784) "Buschenschank".

Sign showing proclamation by Kaiser Joseph II allowing grape farmers to sell their own wine (1784) “Buschenschank”.

The walk will start at Wiener Linien bus 38A stop in the Cobenzl parking lot. We’ll walk down the Oberer Reisenbergweg into the centre of Grinzing, head up to the Krapfenwaldgasse (see the view above). Along the way we’ll talk about history, wine in Vienna and Grinzing.

Der Wiener Heurige sign Grinzing Vienna

Der Wiener Heurige sign Grinzing Vienna

At the end of the walk we’ll stop for a glass of wine and some Heurigen food at Jutta Ambrositsch’s Buschenschank in Residence. Here’s a link to the detailed information about my tour Grinzing, Wein in Wien in case you’d like to take the walk by yourself. Contact me and I can send you my notes for the tour.

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