Action: Tactical Urbanist’s Guide to Materials and Design

Action: Tactical Urbanist’s Guide to Materials and Design

Cover of book Tactical Urbanists Guide to Materials and Design (2016).

Cover of book Tactical Urbanists Guide to Materials and Design (2016).

The Street Plans Collaborative published the

Tactical Urbanist’s Guide to Materials and Design

it’s a guidebook on how urban residents can act to create streets and public spaces that are safe and accessible for everyone.

Good examples of tactical urbanism and organisations implementing these projects (e.g., San Francisco’s SFMTrA) are on our Act! page and Streets page.

See also: Your (Just a bit illegal) cheat sheet for hacking safer streets, by Aarian Marshall in Wired 16 December 2016.

Better Reykjavik: crowdsourcing and e-democracy

Better Reykjavik: crowdsourcing and e-democracy

Screenshot of Better Reykjavik website (2017).

Screenshot of Better Reykjavik website (2017).

The Good Practice Exchange at the Wales Audit Office has published an interview with Gunnar Grímsson of the Citizens Foundation in Reykjavik about Better Reykjavik. Here’s a link to the article:

A Better Reykjavik and a stronger community: The benefits of crowdsourcing and e-democracy

The project has been quite successful: well over half the city population has participated, over 3,300 ideas were submitted by users, and 165 of these ideas have been formally accepted.

Here’s a link to the Better Reykjavik website.

Thanks to GovLab.

Planetizen Best Websites 2016

Planetizen Best Websites 2016

Screenshot Planetizen Best Websites of 2016 - showing mini metro game.

Screenshot Planetizen Best Websites of 2016 – showing Brand New Subway game.

Planetizen is a great source of information about all things urban planning. Their annual best of lists are particularly good. This year’s best websites 2016 were just published and they include several related to crowdsourcing and transport. For example the cover photo is Jason Wright’s Brand New Subway game, which is one of our favourite Transport Games.

Crowdsourcing Clean Drinking Water

Crowdsourcing Clean Drinking Water

Screenshot of Citizen Spring project for crowdsourcing water quality data (2016).

Screenshot of Citizen Spring project for crowdsourcing water quality data (2016).

Here’s a great post from the Planetizen Blog Crowdsourcing Clean Drinking Water, Interview with Sean Montgomery by Casey Brazeal, posted August 22, 2016. Sean Montgomery is the inventor of CitizenSpring (Kickstarter), an app that collects and maps data about safe drinking water. It’s currently a Kickstarter project.

CitizenSpring is a great example of how to use sensors and mapping to crowdsource data collection. The Planetizen interview has lots of good information for anyone interested in using sensors to crowdsource.

SeeClickFix – 2 million issues + future

SeeClickFix – 2 million issues + future

Screenshot of SeeClickFix website (2015)

SeeClickFix is a great example of a crowdsourced reporting application.

Update: SeeClickFix is ten years old! Happy Birthday to a great civic crowdsourcing application!

SeeClickFix a leader in developing applications and software allowing residents to report issues (crowdsourcing) to governments and agencies just celebrated it’s 2,000,000-th reported issue. Ben Berkowitz, the founder of SeeClickFix, just posted (2015) a short history of SeeClickFix and announced a new feature they are developing (expected 2016) that will allow the people reporting issues to communicate directly with each other to solve problems. Right now SeeClickFix describes issues on maps (and to local governments that subscribe to its feed) but does not provide tools for people to interact. Sounds like a great new feature for a fantastic application.

History of City Planning Games

History of City Planning Games

Screenshot from original SimCity game on Commodore 651 computer.

Screenshot from original SimCity game on Commodore 651 – illustration from ArsTechnica article.

Richard Moss has written an excellent history of city planning (building) games in Ars Technica. It’s great to see how city planning games have evolved and some of the ideas developers have implemented over the years. Lots of lessons for taking city games further. Full article: “From SimCity to, Well, SimCity: The History of City-Building Games

Post Archive