City Swipe – Santa Monica Downtown

City Swipe – Santa Monica Downtown

Screenshot of Santa Monica City Swipe App (2017).

Screenshot of Santa Monica City Swipe App (2017).

City Swipe is a Tinder-like application designed to collect input on what people like and dislike about downtown Santa Monica (California).

It’s really simple to use and therefore good for collecting lots of input. Here are the instructions from the project website: www.dtsmcityswipe.com

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS
Each slide will show an image and a question pertaining to a different element of Downtown. There are two different types of questions:

1. Yes or No Questions
(Swipe RIGHT for YES or LEFT for NO)

2. Which Do you Prefer?
(Swipe LEFT for the PHOTO ON THE LEFT or RIGHT for the PHOTO ON THE RIGHT)

COMMENTS
If you have more to say about a certain question, please click the chat button on that question’s slide and leave us your comments. Then swipe to the next slide.

Your feedback will be incorporated into Downtown Santa Monica’s recommendations for the City of Santa Monica’s Downtown Community Plan. This plan will help guide the future of Downtown for the next 15 years. So please take a moment to share your thought with us, and have some fun!

More information from Springwise at: Citizens give feedback on city development via Tinder-style app

Transport Data – Challenges and Opportunities

Transport Data – Challenges and Opportunities

Cover of report Getting Smart on Data (2016).

Cover of report Getting Smart on Data (2016).

Getting Smart on Data: Challenges and Opportunities for Transport Authorities from Emerging Data Sources was produced by the Urban Transport Group and presents results of an emerging data catapult meeting held in May 2016. The Urban Transport Group is the UK’s network of city region transport authorities.

Press release from Urban Transport Group Call to action from Urban Transport Group to ‘get smart on data’ with link to full document “Getting Smart on Data” (PDF).

The report presents very helpful and interesting information.

DIY Street Activism and Tactical Urbanism Groups

DIY Street Activism and Tactical Urbanism Groups

Photo of DIY bike lane improvements by PDX Transformation (Portland Oregon) 2016.

DIY bike lane improvements by PDX Transformation (Portland Oregon) 2016.

Here are some links to independent groups making DIY transport improvements to improve pedestrian and bicycle safety, and articles about their work. Feel free to add more in the comments.

San Francisco – SFMTrA

SFMTrA website

Building DIY Bike Lanes as a Form of Activism, John Metcalfe, The Atlantic CityLab, 23 December 2016.

San Francisco Makes a Guerrilla Bike Lane Permanent, John Metcalfe, The Atlantic CityLab, 12 October 2016.

Portland, Oregon – PDX Transformation

Demanding More from the City, by PDX Transformation, The Portland Mercury, 20 July 2016.

New York – Transformation Department

An Anonymous Group Is Fixing Bike Lanes Where New York Isn’t, Sarah Goodyear, The Atlantic CityLab, 30 October 2015.

Boston – Flowers & Such: Boston Bike Lanes

A crowdfunding project raising money for flowers and safety improvements in Boston.

Making Citizen-Generated Data Work

Making Citizen-Generated Data Work

Cover of report Making Citizen Generated Data Work (2017)).

Cover of report Making Citizen Generated Data Work (2017)

Our Analyse page describes ways to crowdsource data analysis and collection. Here’s an interesting post from the Open Knowledge International Blog about a new report on the subject:

The report “Making Citizen-Generated Data Work” asks what makes citizens and others want to produce and use citizen-generated data. It was written by Danny Lämmerhirt, Shazade Jameson, and Eko Prasetyo. Report available at: https://civicus.org/thedatashift/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Making-Citizen-Generated-Data-Work_short-report_.pdf

The report demonstrates that citizen-generated data projects are rarely the work of individual citizens. Instead, they often depend on partnerships to thrive and are supported by civil society organisations, community-based organisations, governments, or business. These partners play a necessary role to provide resources, support, and knowledge to citizens. In return, they can harness data created by citizens to support their own mission. Thus, citizens and their partners often gain mutual benefits from citizen-generated data.

Action: Tactical Urbanist’s Guide to Materials and Design

Action: Tactical Urbanist’s Guide to Materials and Design

Cover of book Tactical Urbanists Guide to Materials and Design (2016).

Cover of book Tactical Urbanists Guide to Materials and Design (2016).

The Street Plans Collaborative published the

Tactical Urbanist’s Guide to Materials and Design

it’s a guidebook on how urban residents can act to create streets and public spaces that are safe and accessible for everyone.

Good examples of tactical urbanism and organisations implementing these projects (e.g., San Francisco’s SFMTrA) are on our Act! page and Streets page.

See also: Your (Just a bit illegal) cheat sheet for hacking safer streets, by Aarian Marshall in Wired 16 December 2016.

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